Trading Places with Yourself

In the 1983 comedy, Trading Places, Eddie Murphy portrays a petty thief who is transformed into a wealthy broker while Dan Aykroyd unwillingly takes Murphy’s place as a hapless beggar. All these events occur at the whim and prompting of two overindulgently pompous brothers (The Dukes), who place a single dollar bet claiming they could achieve this life swap through their influence and connections. The Dukes are successful. But of course, as in most Hollywood tales, all is right at movie’s end as both Murphy and Aykroyd end up wealthy while the villainous Duke’s end up destitute, thanks to felonious Orange futures forecasts.

Although just a movie, has anyone ever considered just how thin the line is between poverty and affluence? Of course most realist would call to my attention how thickly padded the line is, specifically with assets and trust funds. In truth, socioeconomic status is more a state of mind than most choose to acknowledge. Once you have thoroughly convinced yourself that a particular lifestyle is either off limits or destined to occur, you are likely to do everything possible to achieve or avoid it.

When we decide to, nothing detracts us from fulfilling on our plans. Not weather, finances, personalities or otherwise. How is it possible that we can control our destiny on certain days but not others? Insurmountable circumstances not withstanding, can one surmise then that our current economic status may also be by choice? Bet yourself a dollar and see what happens.

To read more from contributor, Alfred Obiesie, visit his blog at http://crazedafrykan.blogspot.com.

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